The last one was all because of a music video. This one’s all because of a girl.

What is it?

Darkest Days is the third album released by Stabbing Westward, another of those 1990s post-grunge angst-and-woe bands that made a bit of a splash for a brief moment. It’s a whopping 16 tracks long, most of the songs clocking in at close to three minutes.

How does it sound?

How can sampler mix be justified by you?

Why this pick?

I got into this band because of a girl. It was her favorite band at the time, and enough of it clicked with my tastes that I ended up buying several of the available albums at the time.

Let’s be honest, I could say that about several artists in my library, but… anyway. Moving along!

So why this record out of the three? Because it’s the best of the bunch. The album before this is quite good, the one afterward (the final release before the band’s breakup) is okay but doesn’t click with me very well, and for all that it’s supposedly a “concept album” I find Darkest Days to be the album where Stabbing Westward really brought it all together.

Let’s be clear, though: Like last week’s pick, there’s a very specific “angry mopey white dude” sound at play here. Mileage, it will definitely vary.

Which songs are the highlights?

The title track leads things off well, and sets the tone for the proceedings. And that tone is, generally speaking, “loud & angry.” Let’s be clear, this is mostly not a subtle piece of musical artwork. Generally well-crafted for what it is, mind you, otherwise I’d not be sitting here writing about it.

Darkest Days doesn’t really front-load the strongest songs, due to its attempted concept-album structure. This provides an interesting fringe benefit: The high points are scattered throughout, which I generally prefer to an album which one can simply turn off after the first four tunes. So a few songs after “Darkest Days” we get “Drugstore,” and a couple after that one there’s the best-known track on the record, “Save Yourself.” Shortly afterward is the album version of “Torn Apart,” a barn-burner of a tune that was collaboratively reworked (for the better) for the Spawn movie soundtrack. Toward the end we find “The Thing I Hate.”

My two absolute favorite tracks, though, are slightly downtempo: “Sometimes It Hurts” and the closing piece, “Waking Up Beside You.”

Which songs don’t work so well?

The album’s commitment to telling a story about a failed (sabotaged, actually) relationship leads to some grim clunkers in the mix: “How Can I Hold On,” and the hitting-rock-bottom depressing-as-heck trifecta of  “Drowning,” “Desperate Now,” and particularly “Goodbye.”

Concept albums are prone to weak tunes in the service of the story, I suppose. Pink Floyd fans might not particularly enjoy my opinions about large portions of The Wall

Which album did you almost pick in favor of this one?

Due to the generally-more-consistent quality over a shorter track count, I very nearly went with Wither Blister Burn + Peel instead. If the above sampler has you intrigued but the idea of a grim break-up-songs concept album turns you off, maybe give that album a try instead.

Any final thoughts?

At this point in my life, most of the songs of the type found on this and the previous album in this year’s project lineup don’t do much for me. I still enjoy enough of the tunes to merit at least a mild recommendation, however. Just… grain of salt, mileage varying, and so on.

And, boy howdy are a lot of these songs making super-unhealthy statements about how relationships work! Yegods. The older I get, the more I cringe at a lot of what little lyrical content actually latches onto my brain for processing.