greyduck.net

Looking For Quacks In The Pavement

Category: Music (page 1 of 9)

Pet Shop Boys – Hotspot

And someone said, “It’s fabulous you’re still around today / you’ve both made such a little go a very long way” — “Yesterday, When I Was Mad”, Pet Shop Boys, Very

With Hotspot hitting stores earlier this year, the Pet Shop Boys have now released fourteen entire full studio records, on top of the never-mind-how-many compilations, EPs, remix albums, singles and so on that comprise their full discography. (Discography is in fact the name of one of their compilation releases. Because of course it is.) This record is billed as completing a trilogy of albums, with 2013’s Electric and 2016’s Super preceding it. So, how does this one fare?

PSB songs tend to fall into one or more standard categories: Dance tracks, sappy downtempo pieces, biting satire, and weird experiments. All of the biting satire was siphoned off for last year’s delightful Agenda EP which is worth the price of admission for “On social media” alone, with an honorary mention for “What are we going to do about the rich?”. What remains for this album are several solid dance numbers, one weird experimental bit (“Wedding In Berlin”) at the tail end, and a mixed bag of downtempo pieces. The boys are in solid form here, make no mistake. It’s just that their sappier numbers tend not to work for me, so what I’m really getting out of this are the dance songs.

Which isn’t a bad thing, because the three best ones here are “Will-o-the-wisp” right at the start, “Dreamland” (with guest vocals) a few tracks on, and “Monkey business” just past the halfway mark. I can’t decide which of the three I like best, and believe me I’ve listened to them frequently enough this past week-or-so that I should’ve been able to by now. They’re all really, really good, let’s just leave it at that.

Is Hotspot worth your money? That depends on if you like other Pet Shop Boys music and want more of it. There’s no mistaking this for anything but a PSB record, with just enough new twists and variations to assure the listener that Tennant and Lowe haven’t entirely submitted to the ravages of time. As a fan since almost the beginning, I give it a solid stamp of approval.

Mono Inc – The Book of Fire

One thing about 2020 started off well: Two of my favorite musical acts released albums on the same day. Let’s dig into the one I pre-ordered, first…

My first exposure to Mono Inc was “Boatman,” a single released in advance of the album Together Til The End, that featured Ronan Harris of VNV Nation. I bought that album and became an instant fan of this goth metal act. Their 2018 album, Welcome to Hell, is absolutely outstanding. I’ve gone a couple records into their back catalog now (Terlingua and Nimmermehr) and have been looking forward to this new release for months now.

The Book of Fire is an interesting record. The band seems to do themed albums, somewhat, after a fashion. They’re all songs from another time, albeit pretending all the while that the other time being referenced had modern drum kits and electric guitars and such. Together Til The End is the golden age of high seas piracy record, Terlingua is the tales of the Wild West record, Welcome To Hell is the Great Plague record, and so on. This one’s harder for me to pin down, though the Spanish Inquisition and The Crusades seem to figure prominently. Make of it what you will, I suppose. Maybe if I was better at parsing lyrics it would all come clearer for me. Such is life.

Mono Inc is, first and foremost, a hard rock band. Barn-burners and rock anthems are their stock in trade. That hasn’t changed on this album, not really, but they seem to be experimenting with pushing song lengths out quite a bit. I checked: Most songs on the previous four albums are within half a minute of the four minute mark, and rarely did they push past five minutes. “It Never Rains” on Terlingua is an outlier at six full minutes long. The Book of Fire starts out, track one, with the title song clocking in at a full seven minutes twenty. It’s encroaching on Yes-like prog-rock territory, and it’s one of two songs here to smash past the seven minute mark.

(If you buy the digital release, by the way, some bets are hedged: There’s a “single” version of the title song which is… just under six minutes long. Well then.)

Fewer than half of the dozen songs on this release are under five minutes long. A big change! But does it work? I mean, as I noted in my review of Garbage’s Strange Little Birds album, going prog is certainly pitching to my strike zone as a music fan. Unfortunately in this case… it does not entirely work out. The band mostly takes advantage of the extra song length to repeat lyrics and choruses a bit more. The other seven-minute-plus song here, “Where The Raven Flies,” gets a lot right and almost justifies the entire experiment in the extended bridge section but ends up needing to be edited down by an entire lyrics/chorus cycle. I almost love it, I really do. It really swings for the fences, though, and I absolutely want to see the band try this sort of thing again. With practice I think they could get good at it.

With that said, let’s be clear: This is still a nice big bundle of barn-burners and rock anthems. “Louder Than Hell” is, well, the “Welcome To Hell” of this album. (Speaking of comparisons to the previous record: I really wish they hadn’t almost completely lifted the superb “A Vagabond’s Life” from the last album and turned it into “Nemesis.” I can’t hear the new song without wishing I was listening to the other version of it.) “Right For The Devil” and “The Gods of Love” and “Warriors” are standouts in an album that doesn’t have any truly awful songs out of the dozen on offer.

Overall, The Book of Fire is a strange combination of the band playing it safe (moving away from some of the more experimental structure and pacing of the last album in favor of mostly straight-up rocking out) and trying something new (extended song lengths, including two songs with prog-like structuring). It’s not bad, it’s not the best, it’s just pretty good. As Patrick H Willems has pointed out, there’s nothing inherently wrong with “pretty good.” So yes, I can recommend the album.

We were the pop kids.

I just finished listening to the Pet Shop Boys “The Parlophone Years” documentary/mixtape presentation at the BBC. It’s quite good and the interview bits run the expected gamut from informative to amusing to introspective, and you get bits and pieces of songs from nearly the entirety of their career. (They left EMI/Parlophone shortly before releasing their 2013 album, Electric.)

There are three main musical acts at the core of my library. Genesis (and most of its solo offshoots), Midnight Oil, and the Pet Shop Boys. Of those, only one remains active. What this documentary program reminded me of is that for basically my entire music-purchasing life I’ve been fortunate enough to get a new PSB record every so often, and nearly every time I’ve found something to enjoy about the new record. That’s a thirty-year-plus run of superb songcraft.

“Opportunities.” “Suburbia.” “It’s a sin.” “Left to my own devices.” “Always on my mind.” “Domino dancing.” “How can you expect to be taken seriously?” “So hard.” “Being boring.” “I wouldn’t normally do this kind of thing.” “Single.” “Yesterday, when I was mad.” “Closer to heaven.” “Integral.” “The Sodom and Gomorrah Show.” “Pandemonium.” “Did you see me coming?” “Love etc.” “Leaving.” “The pop kids.”

And that’s just selections you can hear bits of in the program linked above, to say nothing of, let’s say, “The end of the world” or “The Theatre” or “Metamorphosis” or “Up against it” or “To step aside” (look, Bilingual is an amazing album, okay?) or “Minimal” or “Twentieth Century” and so forth.

I feel like I’ve reconnected just a bit with one of the key threads woven into the fabric of my conscious life. Not a bad way to spend part of a day off, yeah? Yeah.

Pulp Pulp Culture Culture

I should know better than to tag songs on “best-of” albums.

It’s an okay song, I just didn’t necessarily want to hear it twice within half an hour.

What we’ve got here is failure to communicate the result of my ratings-tagging both the Thomas Dolby record Aliens Ate My Buick and the Thomas Dolby best-of compilation record Retrospectacle. I use MediaMonkey to build random playlists. Some are for specific bands or genres, others boil down to “give me X minutes of songs with a Y star rating or higher.”

The above screenshot is from my “MEHs Haul” playlist: 90 minutes of three-star tracks that haven’t been played in the last few weeks. I’m used to getting studio and live versions of the same song, especially in my workday-length random playlist. The same studio recording twice in relatively rapid succession, though? That’s my own danged fault.

Maintaining a digital music library is an ever-ongoing task, apparently.

3WA: Looking back, looking ahead

The weekly word working assignment is nearing the end of its first year. Overall, how did it go? I consider it a success. I never missed an update, I’m reasonably proud of most of the posts, and there’s a chance (however slim) that I may have led someone to watch something they might have overlooked otherwise.

Fine, fine… my readership amounts to maybe three entire souls. Slim chance, indeed. But capturing an audience wasn’t the primary goal. Forcing myself to get back into the habit of logging into this thing and flexing my writing muscles, that was the primary goal.

The remaining two 3WA posts for 2017 are in the bag. They’ll show up this and next Friday, right on schedule. I made sure to complete them before my mid-month vacation in order to dedicate vacation time to next year’s project prep. I chose a more challenging format, one which requires more work than just sourcing some screenshots.

It’s time to look ahead.

During the year two thousand seventeen, I wrote about fifty-two pieces of animation that brought me some measure of joy. In the year to come I intend to write about fifty-two music albums which bring me some measure of joy. Joy, as we established at the outset, is a key part of this ongoing project. The 3WA concept was born from a deep, desperate need to focus on the good things in life, and if the unrelenting hellshow of 2016 gave rise to this year’s project then what else could I do coming out of 2017 but to bump things up a level?

So, without further ado: Do you have a few minutes? About ten of them, actually? Because right here, right now, you can decide if it’s worth tuning in for 2018’s 3WA series.

Bonus points if you can name more than half the artists (without using search engines to cheat, mind you).

Capsule Review Roundup

We’ll round out this summer run of music (and related products) reviews with a handful of most-recent-album selections which I just couldn’t work up enough enthusiasm for to devote a full entry’s worth of time & effort…

  • Apocalyptica, Shadowmaker – So they’ve got a dedicated singer now. “Cold Blood” is good, the rest of the record left me… cold. Pass.
  • Giorgio Moroder, Déjà Vu – Two of the three instrumentals (“74 is the New 24” and “4 U with Love”) are pretty good, but what’s really weird about this record is that my favorite song is sung by someone I’ve never really enjoyed before (Britney Spears) and is a cover of a song I utterly loathed in its most famous incarnation (“Tom’s Diner”). Yeah, I dunno either. Overall, a so-so record.
  • Muse, Drones – I’m not a mega-fan of Muse. I tend to really enjoy three or four songs per album and can leave the rest. (Except in the case of the previous album, The 2nd Law, which I mostly hated.) This one is… okay. It’s a concept album, which probably doesn’t help.
  • Queensrÿche, Condition Hüman – QR has a new singer as of the album previous to this one. He sounds… ridiculously like the previous singer. I mean it’s really uncanny. So the good news is, if you like QR, you’ll probably have no trouble enjoying this album. I’m… not a huge QR fan. (That would be the other member of my household, hence why this is in my library to begin with.) A few songs work for me, the rest leave me underwhelmed.
  • Seabound, Speak In Storms – VNV Nation and mind.in.a.box led me to this band via vague musical association. If you like either of those other two acts you probably already know about Seabound. If not, well: it’s dark, dance-y European electronica. I generally like this album. The lyric content seems a bit grim, and sometimes the music goes along with that and sometimes it’s distinctly contrasted, upbeat. If you’re curious, I recommend hunting down the tracks “For Another Day,” “Everything,” and “When She’s Hungry.”

That’ll do for now. What do you think I should try next…?

« Older posts

© 2020 greyduck.net

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑